Week of July 22 - Day 1

Scripture to Memorize: Acts 18:26

 He began to speak boldly in the synagogue, but when Priscilla and Aquila heard him, they took him aside and explained to him the way of God more accurately.

Day 1 Read: Acts 18:24-28

Now a Jew named Apollos, a native of Alexandria, came to Ephesus. He was an eloquent man, competent in the Scriptures. 25 He had been instructed in the way of the Lord. And being fervent in spirit, he spoke and taught accurately the things concerning Jesus, though he knew only the baptism of John. 26 He began to speak boldly in the synagogue, but when Priscilla and Aquila heard him, they took him aside and explained to him the way of God more accurately. 27 And when he wished to cross to Achaia, the brothers encouraged him and wrote to the disciples to welcome him. When he arrived, he greatly helped those who through grace had believed, 28 for he powerfully refuted the Jews in public, showing by the Scriptures that the Christ was Jesus.

Reflect: What do we learn about Apollos from verses 24-25? If Apollos’s understanding of God’s work was limited to John the Baptist’s teaching, what was missing from his knowledge of Jesus and Christianity?

Consider: What took place in verses 24–28 occurred after Paul left Ephesus (v. 21) and before he returned (19:1). During this interval, a church had been started, probably under the influence of Aquila and Priscilla. To this church came the gifted Apollos from Alexandria in northern Africa. As a Jew, he knew the Scriptures, that is, the Old Testament, well. His doctrine regarding Jesus was accurate but deficient. Probably this means Apollos did not know about the Holy Spirit’s baptism. John’s baptism symbolized cleansing by God because of repentance toward God. But Christian baptism pictures union with Christ in His death, burial, and resurrection by means of Spirit baptism.1

Respond: What lessons can we learn from Priscilla and Aquila’s investment in Apollos’s life? What key truths about Jesus would’ve been included in their teaching? Who in your life is most curious about Christianity? Why might it be challenging to listen to them attentively and engage them in conversations about faith?

 

 

1 Stanley D. Toussaint, “Acts,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 408–409.